Here is the number of clothes you should not have in your wardrobe - your children will thank you

There is a maximum number of clothes you should not exceed in your wardrobe as well as a maximum number of clothes you should buy each year.

Here is the number of clothes you should not have in your wardrobe - your children will thank you

There is a maximum number of clothes you should not exceed in your wardrobe as well as a maximum number of clothes you should buy each year.

Having a huge wardrobe and so many clothes that you forget and don't know what to do with them, some people dream of it. And yet, the clothing industry is an ecological disaster, it's no longer a surprise. From the production stages to the waste generated, each garment we buy has an ecological cost that is often underestimated. According to a report published by Berlin researchers from the Hot or Cool Institute in 2022, 4% of global carbon dioxide emissions in fact come from fashion.

The clothes we wear represent immense energy costs. From the first stage of the clothing production chain, with the cultivation of raw materials (cotton, polyester or wool, etc.), to its compulsive purchase, including the use of chemicals for its manufacture, or that, excessive, of water and energy, but also (above all?) to its transport over thousands of kilometers which generates considerable greenhouse gas emissions... The globalization of the fashion industry is an ecological disaster.

The rise of fast fashion has radically transformed the way we consume fashion. Short production cycles encourage impulse buying and the creation of a “throwaway” culture, where clothing is often used a few times before being discarded. Textile waste has become a major problem, with adverse consequences on landfill sites. When our clothes reach the end of their life cycle, the problem doesn't go away. Most clothing is made from blends of materials that are difficult to recycle, and many end up in landfills, contributing to environmental pollution.

Faced with these challenges, individual and collective responsibility is crucial. As consumers, we can choose brands that are conscious of their environmental impact, prefer sustainable materials and extend the life of our clothes. Also, according to this same report, German researchers suggest that a “sufficient” wardrobe consists of 74 items of clothing and 20 outfits. Purchases of new clothing may be limited to an average of five items per year. A finding established on the carbon footprint of fashion in the 20 richest countries in the world, per person.

The fashion industry would need to reduce its emissions to 1.1 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) to meet the Paris Agreement target. In other words, to keep the rise in global temperature below 1.5°C. This would reduce its emissions by around 50% compared to the level of 2.1 billion tonnes recorded in 2018, according to global consultancy firm McKinsey

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