The article allowing abortion to be included in the constitution adopted overnight

The debates were not easy, but the Assembly adopted during the night the article allowing abortion to be included in the constitution, giving a first positive signal to the adoption of the text.

The article allowing abortion to be included in the constitution adopted overnight

The debates were not easy, but the Assembly adopted during the night the article allowing abortion to be included in the constitution, giving a first positive signal to the adoption of the text...

In an electric atmosphere, the National Assembly adopted, on the night of Wednesday January 24 to Thursday January 25, the only article of the constitutional bill, aimed at anchoring the right to voluntary termination of pregnancy (abortion) in the French Constitution. This vote, resulting from passionate and often technical debates, concluded with an overwhelming majority of 99 votes for and 13 against. This victory announces a probable success for the bill, expected for a solemn vote next Tuesday.

The day was marked by blatant divisions within the Hemicycle. On the one hand, a majority of deputies, firmly supporting the text carried by Éric Dupond-Moretti, Keeper of the Seals, and Aurore Bergé, Minister of Equality between women and men. On the other, a resistance bloc, mainly LR deputies, questioning the need to constitutionalize a right that they consider not threatened in France. These MPs, expressing their opinions in their personal capacity, proposed more than 150 amendments, although the majority of their group was not represented in the debates.

At the heart of the discussions, reflection on the fragility of fundamental rights, stimulated by international developments, particularly in the United States, calling into question the right to abortion. This awareness led to a change in position among several political executives, including those who had previously voted against similar proposals.

The ministers vigorously defended the text. Dupond-Moretti highlighted the risks of regression of acquired rights, while Bergé insisted on the importance of securing this essential freedom, attracting broad support from the majority and the left. However, there was not unanimity. Tense exchanges punctuated the debates, with sometimes virulent remarks, such as those of Élisa Martin (LFI) and Xavier Breton (LR), reflecting the deep divide on this societal issue.

The debate was also marked by a controversial proposal from the left to replace the term "woman" with "any person in a situation of pregnancy", to include transgender and intersex people, triggering strong and ironic reactions from the 'opposition.

Despite these tensions, the article was adopted, marking a crucial step in the legislative process. The focus now turns to the Senate, where the battle promises to be more difficult for the government, faced with a majority from the right and the center.

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